Me and my Kamloops
Paddling Through the Floodlands - Kamloops Trails

Paddling Through the Floodlands – Kamloops Trails

When freshet arrives the low-lying floodlands fill with water and we can paddle out from the Tranquille Wildlife Preserve into Tranquille Bay.

An early start often means no wind.   At about 11:00 am the winds start and will be stronger yet by noon.

“Islands” of shrubs stand in the floodwaters.

The Thompson River and Kamloops Lake become one larger lake at this time of the year.

I paddled 2.5 km to the far side and entered a flood channel on the south shore.   A series of channels can be paddled for another 2.5 km east.

At the east end of the flood channels there are some side channels, some of which can be used to get back to the river.   This lagoon by the old pumphouse had a number of geese in the shallow water.   I portaged across the grass for about 10m to get back to the river.

I paddled downstream and crossed the river to the north side, entering more flood channels, working my way back to Tranquille Bay.

The whole loop was 9.7 km, 2.5 hours of paddling through the flooded lands.   After the river crests more birds, fish, insects, and other animals will settle into the area.  We spotted osprey, hawks, ravens, crows, blackbirds, geese, ducks, and some small birds this time.   On other explorations of the floodlands we have spotted river otters, beaver, muskrats, carp, herons, seagulls, western painted turtles, and pelicans.   On the shoreline we have spotted bears, coyotes, and deer.   Raptors patrol the skies.   The Tranquille Wildlife Preserve is a wonderful place to explore in flood season.

 

 

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Doug Smith

Doug writes for Kamloops Trails, a not-for-profit (and ad free) website, offering information on trails, waterways, routes, featured spots, viewpoints, and explorations in the outdoors in the Kamloops area (and beyond).

Doug started exploring this area in 1976 and continues to follow tracks and routes wherever they lead, with the aid of map, compass, GPSr and camera. After many dead-ends, but also many discoveries, he chose to share this information.

The Kamloops Trails website has a massive number of interesting posts and would be of interest to anyone in Kamloops who enjoys the outdoors. Visit the Kamloops Trails website at: http://www.kamloopstrails.net/

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