Top five tips from Academic Advising – TRU Newsroom

Top five tips from Academic Advising – TRU Newsroom

January 4, 2024 at 9:59 am  Education, Kamloops, News

Academic Advisors help students create a customized academic plan that aligns with their educational and career goals.

When it comes to planning and customizing your course load semester after semester, Academic Advising is a resource hub for students.

Before we go any further — what exactly is Academic Advising? Advisors understand program requirements and assist with planning and workload. They can advocate, support and help you build a support network beyond academic planning. Through meaningful and supportive dialogues, advisors provide constructive feedback to nurture student growth and personal development.

Advisors work with you to foster critical thinking, seek out resources proactively and formulate a strategic plan for attaining educational and career objectives. Through meaningful and supportive dialogues, advisors provide constructive feedback to nurture student growth and personal development (talk about wraparound support!).

Here are some helpful tips on how to navigate your advising experience:

  1. Befriend the website: tru.ca/advising should be your go-to resource when exploring your academic options or customizing your course load. (Waiting in line provides an opportunity to review the website and reflect on your questions, in-person, at the kiosk or by email.) DegreeWorks, a web-based degree audit tool, allows you to track your academic progress throughout your certificate, diploma or degree. The academic calendar is easily accessible on the website so you’re able to explore program requirements at a more robust level.
  2. Connect with an advisor (and stay in touch): Booking an appointment with an advisor can set your semester up for success! If you’re in nursing or natural resource science, your first-year courses were preselected, so you’ll need to choose your courses in the second year and beyond. While you can create a strategic academic plan for fall and winter simultaneously, advisors recommend checking in halfway through the semester to assess your progress, needs and options. Kiosks are set up outside the Academic Advising office during more high-traffic times, but you can book an appointment or check in via email anytime.
  3. Contribute to the conversation: The average appointment is 30 to 45 minutes, so make that time count! Reflecting on your needs and concerns helps the advisor dig into some specific planning and reduces the detective work needed to understand what you’re looking for. (If you don’t know what you’re looking for – that’s OK. Start the conversation off by saying exactly that. Advising’s tagline is ‘We advise. You decide,’ so ultimately, the decision is yours. Your parents might want to be involved in the process and while they can join a meeting, third-party outreach is not permitted. When preparing for your appointment, consider these questions: What interests you? What are your goals? What do you like (or dislike)? Career and Experiential Learning can help you identify your pathway with the help of assessments and career advising tools available and an advisor can help you cultivate questions to take with you to your next appointment.
  4. Book early: Don’t wait until the last minute to meet with an advisor. Who needs the stress?! Don’t sweat the uncertainties and unknowns; ease your worries by getting clarity and guidance from an expert. Understanding your options provides direction for the next couple of semesters. Also, giving yourself time and space to review your options allows for calm and rational decision making. Advisors recommend that you check in once a semester or when you feel concerned or overwhelmed with your course load. Ideally, they suggest between April and May, or at the end of the academic year or exam season, planning for the following year, in the middle of the semester or as soon as you are concerned. (So anytime, really.)
  5. Don’t play the comparison game with your peers: While you may be in the same course combination as your friends, how you move and complete is solely on your own accord. It’s okay to have your own timeline and schedule. Perhaps taking four courses instead of five per semester might fit better with part-time employment, health management and social connectedness. If you need to drop a course or withdraw, there’s no shame in choosing to lighten your workload or taking the summer off to rest.

Academic advisors are professionals with a strong foundation in student development theory and advising practices. They work in partnership with students to foster critical thinking, seek out resources proactively and formulate a strategic plan for attaining educational and career objectives. Advisors embrace a holistic approach and recognize the unique individuality of students, including their diverse interests, aspirations, experiences and backgrounds. Through meaningful and supportive dialogues, advisors provide constructive feedback to nurture student growth and personal development. Learn more at tru.ca/advising.

View Link to Original Source

No conversations yet

Activity Stream

Thu, Jun 6, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: Ignoring climate crisis won’t make it disappear
Thu, May 30, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: False balance favours industry over wildlife
Thu, May 23, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: The buzz on wild bees versus honeybees
Thu, May 16, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: High hopes for hemp? – David Suzuki Foundation
Thu, May 9, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: Profit obsession inflames environmental racism
Thu, May 2, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: LawnShare helps create vibrant, biodiverse havens
Thu, Apr 25, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: The dry facts about increasing water scarcity
Thu, Apr 18, 2024 at 8:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: Igniting the great global transformation
Thu, Apr 11, 2024 at 4:00 am - David Suzuki posted on their blog: Carbon pricing 101: How it works!
Full Stream